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Promoting a faster Photoshop experience for all users

Users of the previous version see: How to tune Photoshop CS5 for peak performance

The depth and spread of tools and features in Adobe Photoshop CS6 and Photoshop CS6 Extended software make the two editions applicable to a variety of work environments and suitable for a wide range of tasks by image-makers of all skill levels, from enthusiasts to professionals. In some environments, Photoshop is employed in a dedicated, standalone fashion, while in others, it is a pivotal part of a larger suite of programs. Making sure that your computer meets the minimum system requirements is an essential first step in ensuring that all features function correctly. Optimizing your Photoshop CS6 setup to suit your work environment and the tasks you regularly perform is the next step. All users will benefit from such optimization, but those who work with video, 3D content, or other large files—or those who process multiple files at once—will see the greatest performance gains. This paper provides guidance on best practices to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance with a combination of careful hardware selection and informed program setup.

What type of Photoshop user are you
Determining how you typically use Photoshop will help you make more informed decisions about the best ways to optimize your setup. For instance, the photographer who regularly processes high-resolution images will greatly benefit from increasing the amount of system RAM available to Photoshop, whereas the designer who works with 3D models will obtain far better performance by installing a faster video card containing more video RAM. So, itemize the tasks that you regularly perform in Photoshop and then use the recommended setup details contained in this paper as the basis for optimizing your system.

Essential hardware
Computers are built with a variety of components. Each performs a different function, and together they affect the overall performance of Photoshop. The following sections describe system components and the roles they play in the image-editing and enhancement process.

Table of Contents:

64-bit architecture
Memory (RAM)
Storage (hard disk):

  • Startup drive
  • Scratch disks
  • Data Drive

Processor (CPU)
Video or graphics card
Screen or Monitor
Key steps to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance:

Additional Information

64-bit architecture

Photoshop CS6 provides 64-bit support on both Mac and Windows® systems. Substantial performance gains can be achieved by switching from running Photoshop in 32 bit to the 64-bit version of the program, especially when working with large or complex files or when processing multiple images at a time. The 64-bit architecture supports management of larger amounts of RAM and better processing of larger amounts of imaging data. Note that to run Photoshop CS6 in 64-bit mode, your hardware and operating system must both be 64-bit compatible.

Microsoft® Windows 7 ships in 32-bit or 64-bit versions, and Photoshop CS6 will only work in 64-bit mode when the 64-bit version of Windows 7 is running. You can check which version you are running by viewing the system type information in the System section of Windows Control Panel.

On the Apple platform running Mac OS X, a system that supports 64-bit mode is required for Photoshop CS6 as the application is 64-bit only (all but the very first generation of Intel iMac, MacBook, and MacBookPro systems support 64-bit mode).

The easiest way to check which version of Photoshop is running is to view the details on the splash screen that is displayed when the program starts. Next to the version number you will see x64 for 64-bit mode or x32 for 32-bit mode.

Photoshop CS6 Splash Screen

Recommendations
If you regularly work with large files, process multilayered Photoshop documents, and/or enhance multiple highresolution raw files, then running the 64-bit version of Photoshop CS6 will increase your productivity. Your computer hardware and operating system must support the 64-bit structure before you can run the program in this mode. Note that Mac users with 64-bit capable hardware but running Mac OS X in 32-bit mode can still run Photoshop CS6 in 64-bit mode.

Memory (RAM)

RAM is the short-term memory where Photoshop (and other programs), image data, and various Undo steps and History States are kept during the image-editing and enhancement process. RAM is different from hard-drive or DVD disk memory, as the information stored in RAM is lost when your computer is switched off. For efficient photo editing, the amount of RAM your computer contains is just as important as the overall processing power of your system. In general, more RAM means better Photoshop performance. This is especially true of 64-bit systems, where larger amounts of memory can be addressed and used more efficiently. Keep in mind that Photoshop will be sharing available RAM with the computer’s operating system as well as other programs and utilities running at the same time. So not all the RAM installed in the system can be used by or should be allocated to Photoshop. How Photoshop shares the memory is controlled by the settings in the Performance panel of the Preferences dialog box. Refer to the “Key steps to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance” section for details about optimizing the settings in the Preferences dialog box.

The total amount of RAM that can be installed on your system, and used by Photoshop CS6, is determined by the hardware specifications of your computer and your operating system. When Photoshop is running in 32-bit mode, it can only directly access up to approximately 3GB of RAM. On a 64-bit operating system running on a compatible 64-bit architecture with Photoshop CS6 running in 64-bit mode, the program can directly access as much RAM as the computer supports, but for best performance, you should leave room for the operating system and other programs to run.

About This Mac dialog box for Mac computers." width="362">
Check the amount of RAM you have installed by viewing the installed memory values in the System section of the Control Panel (Windows) or the Apple > About This Mac dialog box for Mac computers.

Note that the performance gains obtained by increasing RAM are more noticeable when adding RAM to a system with a low amount, such as 1GB, and are less dramatic on systems with higher amounts of installed RAM, like 32GB. Also, users who regularly process large files (over 500MB) and/or complex documents with many layers will see greater performance improvements with the addition of extra RAM than those working with smaller, less complex images. For more details about how to determine if your system could benefit from more RAM, read the “Key steps to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance” section.

Recommendations
In general, you should buy as much memory as you can afford and your system can support, since adding more RAM is one of the simplest ways to improve overall Photoshop performance. But remember that only 64-bit systems can effectively address more than 4GB of RAM.

Storage (hard disk)

The hard drive in your computer performs three key functions when processing your image files:

  • Provides access to the operating system and programs like Photoshop
  • Stores your image files
  • Gives extra memory resources (called virtual memory or scratch disks) to Photoshop when processing requirements exceed available RAM

All three tasks are essential for image processing and ensuring that your hard drive is fast; has plenty of spare space; is free from errors; and is regularly defragmented, which will improve performance in all these key areas. For maximum performance, a fast, dedicated drive should be allocated for each of these tasks. A typical setup would include a startup drive for system and program files, a data drive for storing all image and project files, and a scratch disk drive for virtual memory.

Startup Drive
Both Photoshop CS6 and your operating system have minimum requirements for hard-drive free space. For Photoshop, it is 2GB, and for most operating systems, the minimum requirement is 20GB. But keep in mind that these are minimum requirements, and the more free space, the better. Speed is also a factor with this drive, and many high-performance systems now use solid-state drives (SSDs) for startup, as they provide very fast read and write access.

Scratch Disks
When Photoshop needs more memory than that available, it uses a portion of the hard drive as virtual memory or scratch disks. This process allows you to work with large image changes that exceed the capacity of your system RAM. The more hard-drive space available and the faster the drive access speed, the more efficient this process becomes. As a rule of thumb, aim for hard drives with faster disk rotation (usually classified in RPM) and faster read/write speeds. If you have the budget, then take a look at SSDs. Ideally, you should use a dedicated, empty hard drive that is not your startup disk, but if empty drives are not possible, at least make sure that the free space on your scratch disks is not fragmented.

To view or adjust your scratch disk settings, choose Photoshop/Edit > Preferences > Performance and look at the scratch disks area in the middle of the panel. The panel will show you a list of all hard drives attached to your system, and you can arrange both the order in which Photoshop uses them and which drives to use at all. Up to 64EB of scratch disk space is supported on a total of four volumes (an exabyte is equal to 1 billion gigabytes). If you have more than one drive and you want to include your startup drive as part of the scratch disk, be sure it is last in order for maximum efficiency. You should also use hard drives with fast access (read/ write) speeds and as a general rule avoid removable or networked drives, which cause performance lags due to the time required for communication to and from the disks.

Assign the drives to be used as a scratch disk, and the sequence in which they will be used, with the settings in the Performance section of the Photoshop Preferences dialog box.

Faster drive access can be achieved by using an SSD or by installing multiple drives in a RAID system. RAID setups require two or more disk drives and a special hard drive controller. Many motherboards now have RAID controllers built in, reducing the need to buy and install a separate board. When first creating the RAID setup, Photoshop users should set their scratch disk to operate in RAID level 0. This mode uses two or more drives to provide extra performance by writing information across multiple drives.

How do I know what is the total amount of memory (both RAM and scratch disk space) available to Photoshop during editing operations
Photoshop displays RAM and scratch disk usage and allocation in the Scratch Sizes section of the status bar. The number on the left represents the amount of memory currently being used by the program to display all open images. The number on the right represents the total amount of RAM available for processing these images.

Data Drive
The speed of your data drive will affect how long it takes to open and save files—faster drives will increase read and write performance in Photoshop. For this reason, many professionals also employ a RAID drive system to store their photos and project files. But keep in mind that with data, it is also important to ensure that the files are secure and regularly backed up. Select a different RAID mode such as level 1, which mirrors the files over the disks, or level 5, which combines performance and security measures. For the best performance, avoid network or external drives due to their relatively slow access times.

Recommendations
For maximum performance, use separate, dedicated physical drives for startup, data, and scratch drives. All drives should be fast and regularly defragmented. Also, when possible, multiple drives set up in a RAID 0 array should be used for your scratch disks and data drives, and an SSD should be used for startup.

Which RAID setting should I use

  • RAID 0: The fastest RAID setup is level 0, but it offers no data protec- tion (if one of the drives goes bad, you lose all the data). This setting is typically used for scratch disks.
  • RAID 1: RAID level 1 mirrors your data across multiple drives (if one fails, you still have your data). This option is best for storing your image files.
  • RAID 5: RAID level 5 combines the two for faster performance and redundant data storage. This makes RAID 5 a good option for data storage.

Processor (CPU)

CPU chips are the engine of your computer and, as such, determine how quickly many of the features in Photoshop will function. For many years, processor performance was categorized in terms of clock speed. The higher the value, the more powerful the chip, and the better the image-processing performance. But processor speed alone no longer tells the whole story. Some of the best chips for intensive image-editing tasks (filtering in particular) are not those with the highest clock speeds, but rather those with multiple cores and 64-bit architecture support. This is especially true for specific Photoshop processes, like Radial Blur, that have been optimized for multicore hardware. Other functions, such as file opening and closing, are processed with a single core only, so you will not see a performance improvement in these areas. Note also that the greatest performance gain will be experienced by users changing from a single-core setup to a multicore machine. Users migrating from a multicore system to one with even more cores will see an improvement, but not of the same magnitude.

Photoshop uses multiple cores, or CPUs, to split the processing workload.

Recommendations
If you regularly process large files; build complex, multilayered Photoshop documents; or work with multiple images at a time, then a multicore 64-bit processor will reduce the time to complete complex enhancement steps.

Video or graphics card

The video card is the essential link between computer and monitor. At the most basic level, this component determines the number of colors and the resolution the screen will display as well as the speed at which images will be refreshed. Increasingly though, Photoshop is taking advantage of the powerful processor contained on these cards (called the graphics processing unit or GPU) to help speed up performance and activate a set of special GPU-accelerated features such as canvas rotation, panning and zooming, as well as a variety of GPU-enabled filters like Liquify, Adaptive Wide Angle, Oil Paint, and the new Blur filters (Field Blur, Iris Blur, and Tilt-Shift).

Photoshop CS6 uses the GPU when the installed video card supports the OpenGL standard and has a least 256MB of VRAM (512MB or more is better for 3D work and will be required for future versions of Photoshop). Most basic models sold by leading computer manufacturers today meet these minimum requirements, but the simplest way to verify is to check the GPU Settings area of the Performance panel. If Photoshop CS6 detects a compatible video card, it will be displayed, and the Enable OpenGL option will be activated. You can view the amount of VRAM present on your video card by referring to the Video Card Memory information displayed in the System Info dialog box (choose Help > System Info in Photoshop). For details about optimizing GPU acceleration in Photoshop CS6, refer to the “Key steps to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance” section.

Compatible video cards will be recognized and displayed in the Detected Video Card section of the Performance section of the Preferences dialog box.

Recommendations
For best performance, pick a card from the Photoshop CS6 supported video card list (http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/photoshop-cs6-gpu-faq.html#tested_cards) that has a fast processor and as much memory (VRAM) as you can afford. If you’re working with video files and want to take advantage of GPU acceleration in Adobe Premiere® Pro CS6 software, you should also consult the supported video card list (www.adobe.com/products/premiere/systemreqs) for that program to find an option that suits both Photoshop CS6 and Adobe Premiere Pro CS6 environments.

GPU-accelerated features in Photoshop CS6

Photoshop CS6 harnesses increasing hardware power and speed by introducing new features, like the new Blur filters that take advantage of modern video card technology. GPU features added in Photoshop CS6 include:

  • Adaptive Wide Angle Filter (compatible video card required)
  • Liquify (accelerated by compatible video card with 512 MB of VRAM)
  • Oil Paint (compatible video card required)
  • Warp and Puppet Warp (accelerated by compatible video card)
  • Field Blur, Iris Blur, and Tilt/Shift (accelerated by compatible video
    card supporting OpenCL)
  • Lighting Effects Gallery (compatible video card required with 512 MB
    of VRAM)
  • New 3D enhancements (3D features in Photoshop require a compatible video card with 512 MB of VRAM):
    • Draggable Shadows
    • Ground plane reflections
    • Roughness
    • On-canvas user interface controls
    • Ground plane
    • Light widgets on edge of canvas
    • IBL (image-based light) controller

Screen or Monitor

The role the monitor plays as a preview mechanism cannot be understated. In addition to enabling a fully color-managed Photoshop workflow from capture to output, the quality of your monitor and its regular calibration are essential to ensure the accurate representation of your images on screen. Both Windows and Mac systems ship with software-based display calibration utilities designed to neutralize color casts and standardize contrast and brightness. For more accurate calibration, use a combined hardware and software solution that measures the colors and tones on screen and then creates a custom profile for your monitor.

The minimum pixel dimensions for monitors is 1024×768 pixels, with 1280×800 pixels recommended. But displays with higher dimensions will allow more efficient arrangement of the Photoshop application framework (for example, panels, menu, and toolbar). You may also benefit from spreading the Photoshop workspace over more than one screen, which provides the option to work with images on one screen and panels on another.

The range of tones and colors that can be displayed by your system is determined by the abilities of both the video card and the monitor. The minimum specification for color depth is 16–bit color, but most video card and monitor combinations exceed this recommendation by using a 24–bit color system. This equates to an 8–bits- per-channel pathway for red, green, and blue channels from card to monitor, which is more than enough for most users, as it is possible to display up to 16.7 million colors. But Photoshop is capable of working with higher bit rates when supported by higher-bit-rate-capable cards and monitors. Employing a video card and monitor combination capable of 10 bits per channel increases the display palette to a possible 1.07 billion colors, making it suitable for color-conscious professional photographers who want to see smoother gradations of tones and colors. More details about activating high-bit display mode, currently available only to Windows 7 users, can be found in the “Key steps to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance” section.

Windows 7 users with compatible video card and monitors can take advantage of extra color and tonal rendition by activating 10–bit mode in the driver settings for the card.

Recommendations
Always employ a fully color managed and calibrated system. If you are working with high-resolution or complex images, consider employing a multimonitor display system, but make sure that the video card you use is capable of supporting a multimonitor setup. Windows users who want the ultimate in color and tonal rendition can opt for a card and monitor setup that supports 10-bits-per-channel display. Look for display port connections when searching for cards and monitors that support high-bit display.

Key steps to optimize Photoshop CS6 performance

Knowing which hardware works best for your work environment is just part of the performance story. To ensure that your carefully selected hardware works to its full potential, optimize Photoshop and fine-tune your operating system. And if you’re unable to change hardware, use the following guidelines to adjust Photoshop and your operating system preferences to realize performance gains without added expense.

1. Allocate your scratch disk correctly
To set your scratch disk, choose Edit > Preferences > Performance (Windows) or Photoshop > Preferences > Performance (Mac). Then, in the Scratch Disk section of the panel, select the drive that has the most free space—preferably not your system or startup drive. If you have other drives listed, you can also allocate these as extra scratch drives. Photoshop will use the drive listed first until it is full and then move to the next drive if even more memory is needed. You can change the order in which the drives will be used by selecting a drive and then using the Up or Down Arrow keys to change its position in the list. Place your system or startup drive in last position. The performance of systems whose Efficiency result (see boxout below for details) regularly falls below 95% when conducting simple operations will be improved by the correct allocation of fast scratch disks or the addition of extra RAM.

2. Separate the Photoshop scratch disk from operating system virtual memory
As most operating systems employ a virtual memory system similar to the one in Photoshop, it is recommended that scratch disks be positioned on a different drive than the one your computer uses for its virtual memory system. In general, the operating system’s virtual memory, or swap file, is stored on the startup or system drive. To help with overall Photoshop and Windows/Mac performance, ensure that you don’t position the scratch disk on the same drive.

How do I know if my system could benefit from more RAMPhotoshop contains a simple built-in monitor that can help you determine how efficiently the RAM in your system is being used to process your photos. To test the current memory settings, select the Efficiency setting from the pop-up menu of the Status Bar at the bottom of the document window (or the Info palette), and then perform a series of standard editing actions in Photoshop. If only RAM memory is being used during these editing steps, then the Efficiency result displayed will be 100%.

The value actually represents the percentage of time spent performing the operation instead of reading or writing data to the scratch disk. If the value falls below 100%, Photoshop is using the scratch disk in place of RAM and is therefore operating more slowly than if more memory were available. Regular occurrences of values below 95% means that you need to allocate more RAM to Photoshop, close programs running at the same time as Photoshop, or install more RAM memory.

Select Efficiency from the display menu in the Status Bar. Check the values displayed after different processing steps to ensure that they are close to 100%.

3. Set the RAM percentage used by Photoshop
Photoshop shares the RAM on your computer with the operating system (Windows or Mac OS X) and any other programs running at the same time. The percentage designated in the Memory Usage section of the Preferences Performance panel determines the upper amount of RAM memory that can be used by Photoshop. Most new users push this setting as high as possible, some as much as 90%, thinking that this will speed up the processing of their files. But if this allocation is set too high, both the operating system and Photoshop may need to move information from the fast RAM memory to the slower hard-drive memory while processing. This action is called “page swapping,” as the data is moved back and forth between the different memory spaces, and it causes Photoshop to run more slowly.

Use the RAM slider in the Performance section of the Preferences dialog box to adjust the amount of memory allocated to Photoshop.

When adjusting the amount of memory allotted to Photoshop in the Performance panel, it’s best to keep within the ideal range displayed. Check the Efficiency value on the Status Bar to test whether the settings currently being used are optimal. If you do choose to adjust the Memory Usage settings, change them by no more than 5% at a time, and then restart Photoshop and test the new settings before changing them again.

Remember that with Photoshop CS6 running in 32-bit mode, the program can only directly access up to 3GB for Windows—even if more is installed. In contrast, on 64-bit systems with compatible 64-bit hardware, Photoshop CS6 can directly access as much RAM as is installed on your system.

4. Defragment your drives regularly (Windows OS only, not recommended for Mac OS X)
Please note that this recommendation only applies if you’re using a traditional hard drive (non-SSD) on a Windows-based system.  As images and files are saved and resaved to disk, they tend to become fragmented. This means that rather than the whole file being saved in one continuous space on the hard drive, the information is broken into bits and stored in several locations (wherever there is empty disk space). When the file is reopened, the document is reconstructed from each of the individual pieces. This file fragmentation slows down the opening and saving of files, as well as the running of programs such as Photoshop, if they were fragmented when initially installed. The efficiency of scratch disks is also degraded if the space used for virtual memory is fragmented. You can achieve real performance gains by regularly defragmenting the drives you use for scratch disks, image storage, and application loading.

All Windows operating systems have defragmentation utilities built in. Consult your computer’s Help files to ensure that utilities are activated and, if need be, perform a manual defragmentation of all drives to ensure their continued performance.

The Windows Disk Defragmenter utility allows you to analyze and defragment the hard drives installed on your system.

5. Minimize History StatesThe ability to jump backward and forward through the editing steps stored in the History panel in Photoshop is a very useful feature. Photoshop implements this feature by storing additional copies, called History States, of the image on your hard drive.

A full copy at the original size is stored for every operation you perform that affects the entire image. Smaller changes, like individual paint strokes, require less information per state. The more editing you do, the more hard-drive space will be used for the History States of the document. The History States setting in the Performance panel is set to a default of 20 but can be adjusted from 1 to 1,000, depending on the amount of scratch disk space available and the complexity of your normal image-editing work. If you find that Photoshop is running slowly after you’ve made a few editing changes, then try reducing the number of states. Fewer History States does mean less opportunity to reverse editing changes, but this action frees up memory resources and can bring new life back to a slow-running machine.

The number of History States used by Photoshop can be altered via the History States setting in the Performance section of the Preferences dialog box.

6. Avoid “Out of RAM” errors when running memory-intensive features
Some Photoshop features, such as Content-Aware Scaling, 3D, and Liquify and filters such as the Distort filters are more memory-intensive than others. If when you’re working with these features, Photoshop starts to respond slowly, doesn’t respond, or returns “Out of Memory” or “Out of RAM” errors, then increase the amount of RAM and scratch disk space and close any other programs running at the same time as Photoshop. If the problem persists, then switch to a 64–bit system with more available RAM and scratch disk space.

7. Reduce the number of open files
The more pictures you have open in Photoshop, the more resources your machine is using just to maintain each open file. To speed up processing, make sure that you open (and keep open) only files that are essential for your current editing task.

8. Clear all available memory: Purge Undo, Clipboard, or Histories
The Edit > Purge command can be used to free up RAM space that is being used to store Undo, Clipboard, and Histories entries. Since this command cannot be undone, it should be your last resort when you need to eliminate an “Out of RAM” error during a memory-intensive task.

Purge command to remove information currently being stored in memory." width="411">
Use the Edit > Purge command to remove information currently being stored in memory.

9. Run Photoshop by itselfUse the Edit > Purge command to remove information currently being stored in memory.A simple way to speed up Photoshop is to make sure that no other programs or utilities are running at the same time. After closing unnecessary programs, use your operating system tools to determine which utilities are still running hidden in the background. The golden rule is that if the program or utility is not essential for the editing task, then close the software.

This is especially true if you are using features that rely heavily on the GPU (mainly 3D). Having another application that also relies on the GPU and VRAM open while using these GPU features in Photoshop CS6 will significantly degrade overall performance.

10. Optimize Cache Level and Cache Tile settings
Whenever you make a change to an image onscreen, your computer must redraw the image. The larger the image, the more processing power and time required. To make screen redrawing as fast as possible, Photoshop CS6 uses caching to continuously update a lower resolution version as you work. The default setting is four cache levels, but if you routinely work with images that have large pixel dimensions, you can improve redrawing performance by setting the level higher. Conversely, if you typically work with small-dimension images that contain many layers, you may want to set Cache Level to a level of two. As the cache is also used for other operations, such as the Healing Brush, it is not recommended to set a value of one as this will turn off caching completely, reducing performance in these allied areas.

When Photoshop processes a photo, it splits the picture into smaller image sections called tiles, and it works on each in turn. By default, the size of each tile is 128Kb. You can alter the amount of memory allocated for the processing of each tile via the options in the Cache Tile Size pull-down menu in the Performance panel. Larger tile sizes reduce the amount of time Photoshop takes to process an image, especially on computers with more than 1GB of RAM.

You’ll notice improvements in the speed with which images are drawn to screen when both Cache Level and Cache Tile settings are optimized. To help with accurately setting values, the History Cache section of the Performance panel in the Preferences dialog box now contains three buttons to help match settings with your work environment. The values set by these buttons will vary depending on the amount of RAM and number of processors in your computer. Click the option that best fits your workflow to set both Level and Tile settings.

  • Tall and Thin—Best for users working with images with smaller document dimensions and many editing and enhancement layers.
  • Default—Designed for general use when a user will be working with a variety of document types. This is the default setting.
  • Big and Flat—Works well with large images and few editing or enhancement layers.
Setting the History and Cache values is easier in Photoshop CS6 thanks to the inclusion of three buttons—Tall and Thin, Default, and Big and Flat—in the Performance section of the Preferences dialog box. Select the option that best matches your workload.

11. Reduce patterns and brush tips
Each custom pattern and brush tip you load increases the overall RAM required to run Photoshop CS6, increasing the scratch disk size in the process. If you load up all the patterns and brush tips that ship with Photoshop CS6, your scratch disk file will grow by hundreds of megabytes. To reduce the total RAM used, minimize the number of patterns and brush tips and reduce the number of patterns used in Layer Styles that use Bevel and Emboss Texture or Pattern Overlay.

12. Optimize GPU settings
With the increasing ability of Photoshop to use of the video card GPU for extra processing power, the Preferences dialog box now includes dedicated GPU settings in both its Performance and 3D sections.

If a suitable video card is installed on your system, it will appear in the GPU Settings area of the Performance section. To enable GPU acceleration, make sure that the Enable OpenGL Drawing option is selected. To fine-tune the card’s performance, click the Advanced Settings button and select Basic, Normal, or Advanced, matching the option with your requirements.

  • Basic—Uses the least amount of GPU memory to run the most basic OpenGL features when sharing the GPU with other applications or when experiencing slow responsiveness. Select this option if you have other programs running that also use the GPU or if you notice bad screen redraws or slower performance when using GPU-accelerated features.
  • Normal—Is the default setting. It uses a large amount of GPU memory to support advanced OpenGL features and should be selected if you regularly use the GPU-accelerated features in Photoshop.
  • Advanced—Uses the same amount of memory as the Normal mode, but enables more advanced features to improve drawing performance. This setting is best when working in 3D or when working extensively with the GPU-accelerated features in Photoshop CS5

Keep in mind that mode changes will only take effect after Photoshop is restarted.

The 3D section of the Performances dialog box contains a VRAM slider similar to the memory control located in the Performance section. Use the slider to determine the upper limit of VRAM available to the Photoshop 3D engine. The total value is a percentage of the overall VRAM available. A setting of 100% will still reserve a portion of the overall VRAM for use with the operating system. Higher values will help with overall 3D performance but may compete with other GPU-enabled applications.

The slider in the 3D section of the Preferences dialog box adjusts the amount of VRAM available to Photoshop.

13. Choose the appropriate Photoshop file type
The file type you choose will determine both the functions and features that can be saved with the file as well as the maximum size. PSD and PSB files maintain the most functionality but at the cost of file size, especially if the Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility option is selected. The maximum image sizes possible in standard Photoshop CS6 documents are as follows:

  • PSD (Photoshop)—2GB
  • PSB (Large Document Format)—4EB (Four exabytes equals 4 million terabytes, which is orders of magnitude larger than available hard-drive storage space, but the format has been built to accommodate future innovation.)
  • TIFF—4GB (Note that most other applications cannot work with TIFF images larger than 2GB.)
  • Photoshop PDF—10GB (Individual pages are limited to 200×200 inches.)

14. Set the Maximize File Compatibility option
Photoshop CS6 is the 13th version of the software and includes many changes, additions, and enhancements since its initial release. In addition, today many other software applications are capable of opening Photoshop PSD documents, such as Adobe After Effects® CS6 and Adobe Photoshop Lightroom® 4 software. To help ensure that earlier versions of Photoshop or other applications such as Photoshop Lightroom can open your saved files, Photoshop CS6 by default stores a flattened copy of the image within the PSD or PSB document when it is saved. The advantage of this feature is backwards compatibility with Photoshop itself and better integration with other applications, but the tradeoff is larger file sizes and slower opening and saving of documents. By default, Photoshop CS6 will ask if you want to maintain compatibility whenever you save a PSD or PSB file, but this behavior can be adjusted by choosing Photoshop/Edit > Preferences > File Handling. In the File Compatibility section, you can use the menu labeled Maximize PSD and PSB File Compatibility to set Photoshop to either always or never save this extra flattened image within the file.

15. Turn off thumbnail display
Some of the panels in Photoshop CS6 display preview thumbnails of content, such as the Layers, Channels, and Paths panels. As you edit an image, these thumbnails are dynamically updated to reflect the new content. The more layers or paths in a document, the more thumbnails need to be built, drawn, and updated, each requiring system resources. To free up the resources allocated to this task, open the panel menu and choose Panel Options and then select None to turn off thumbnail display.

Select None in the Layers Panel Options dialog box to free up the resources Photoshop uses to draw thumbnail previews.

16. Reduce color bit depth
In Photoshop CS6, the number of functions that can be performed on 16- and 32-bit images has been increased. However, these images require considerably more processing power and hard-drive space than standard 8-bit images. For images destined for output to standard devices or the web, you can use the Image > Mode menu to lower the bit depth to 8 bit for maximum performance. The exception to this general rule is when you are working with 3D images, as the Ray Tracer engine renders at 32-bit color depth. So if you are working with 3D, start with a 32-bit file with a resolution of 72ppi, and when it comes time to output the finished document, use the tone mapping features in Photoshop to reduce the bit depth to 16 or 8 bits.

17. Deselect Export Clipboard
Whenever you exit Photoshop CS6, anything you have cut or copied is placed on the operating system clipboard. The benefit of this feature is that the content is then available to paste into another application, but exporting the image to the clipboard is time-consuming and processor- intensive. If you don’t require or use the system clipboard to copy and paste between Photoshop and other applications, you can turn off this function by deselecting Export Clipboard in the Options area under Photoshop/Edit > Preferences > General. Note that dragging layers or entire images between documents bypasses the clipboard entirely and is more efficient, even if Export Clipboard is enabled.

Deselect the Export Clipboard option in the General section of the Photoshop Preferences dialog box to stop storing copied documents to the operating system clipboard.

18. Adjust or turn off font preview
Each active font on your computer requires system resources. Photoshop CS6 also uses resources to draw previews of each font in the font and style menus in the Character panel and in the Options bar when a Type tool is enabled. To maximize performance, use font management software to activate only the fonts that you need. In addition, you can adjust the size of the font menu previews, or turn off previews, by choosing Photoshop/Edit > Preferences > Type. Under Font Preview Size, use the menu to adjust the size of the previews, or deselect the option to turn them off altogether.

Turning off font previews or selecting a smaller preview size helps reduce the resources used for this task.

19. Optimize image files
Many factors impact the size of your Photoshop CS6 image files, including resolution and pixel dimensions; color depth and mode; number and complexity of layers, channels, and paths; number of Smart Objects; and more. Very large files take longer to open, and they redraw more slowly as you work with them. They also require much more hard-drive space for storage. Ways to optimize image files include:

  • Minimize file dimensions—Resize the image to the desired size for output rather than working with a very large image and resizing it downward at the end of editing.
  • Minimize complexity—Merge layers that no longer need to be kept separate, and eliminate channels and paths that are no longer needed. Note that this includes blank layers, which also use significant disk space.
  • Choose RGB over CMYK—If your images are going to the web rather than offset printing, use the RGB color model. With one less color channel to save and maintain, an RGB image is 25% smaller than an equivalent CMYK image.
  • Minimize print resolution—Keep your image to the optimal minimum size for the output device, ranging from 72dpi for screen display to 600dpi for high-quality laser printing. Never use a resolution higher than the printing device is capable of outputting.
  • Start with low-resolution 3D files and resize to suit—When working with 3D content, start with smaller, low-resolution documents such as those generally used for the web. The smaller size will provide better and more responsive performance when manipulating and editing the 3D content. As the 3D components are vector-based imagery, the completed image can be resized nondestructively to a different resolution Cucusoft DVD to iPad Converter

Additional Information

Optimize performance | Photoshop CS4, CS5

How to set up a great Photoshop machine

Save Large Photoshop Files 20X Faster in Photoshop CS5

World- Ready Composer in Adobe CS4 Phinney on Fonts

Learn all about the new capabilities that have been added to Profiles in Adobe Camera Raw.

Learn how to create a custom brush in Photoshop CC.

Learn three quick and easy ways to navigate documents in Photoshop CC.

Use these tips to to quickly straighten or rotate images in Photoshop CC.

Learn how to use Variable Radial Symmetry in Photoshop CC.

Learn four ways to select Layers in a Photoshop CC document.

Use these custom keyboard shortcuts to increase productivity in Photoshop CC.

Learn the benefits of using Smart Objects and how to utilize them in Photoshop CC.

Learn how to work with Layer Masks more efficiently by using these 10 shortcuts.

Discover how to use the Fill command in Photoshop CC. Quickly fill areas in an image with color, patterns, history, and the content aware technology to remove distracting elements in an image.

Discover how to use Smart Guides to quickly align and distribute layers and shapes in Photoshop CC.

Learn how to use Smart Filters to give you more flexibility in Photoshop CC.

Julieanne demonstrates three tips for zooming in and out of an image in Photoshop CC.

Check out these handy short cuts to make it easier to work with brushes in Photoshop CC.

Learn six quick tips for selecting colors that will improve your workflow.

Julieanne demonstrates 10 fundamental short cuts for using the Layers Panel

Organizing your layers and affecting multiple layers at once are just two reasons Layer Groups are a powerful feature.

Be more productive with these quick tips for cropping images in Photoshop CC.

Discover how to make precise adjustments using the new Color and Luminance Range Masking in Adobe Camera Raw.

Discover how easy it is to draw resolution independent, vector paths in Photoshop with the new Curvature Pen tool.

Take a look at several improvements made to the way we work with brushes in Photoshop CC including more powerful brush presets, new default brushes, drag and drop organization, and more!

Discover how to create beautiful brush strokes using the new smoothing option and quickly make symmetrical paintings using the Paint Symmetry technology preview in Photoshop CC.

Discover the power of Variable Fonts and additional typographic enhancements in Photoshop CC, including pasting without formatting, property panel enhancements, and paragraph-level composer switching.

In this video Julieanne demonstrates how to download a template into Photoshop CC 2017 and customize the contents by adding photos, changing colors, and modifying text.

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly create new documents, save custom presets, as well as download and license templates from Adobe Stock using Photoshop’s New Document workflow.

In this video tutorial, Julieanne demonstrates the new features and enhancements made to Photoshop’s Libraries panel, including recent and alphabetized Libraries, undo options for deleted assets, the new Find Similar feature, drag and drop Adobe Stock search results and more!

In this video, Julieanne will show how easy it is to find tools, menu items, CC Learn content, and Adobe Stock assets using the new in-application Search command in Photoshop CC 2017.

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates several of the little known feature enhancements in Photoshop CC 2017 that can make a big difference in your workflow, including improvements to Artboards, the Properties panel, Copy As SVG, SVG font support, Export As, and more!

When using the Crop tool to straighten and add canvas area to a photograph, check out the new Content Aware option which will intelligently fill in any transparent areas with computer generated “Content Aware” information in Photoshop CC.

Check out the new features and enhancements made to the Type tools in Photoshop CC including the ability to find similar Typekit fonts, apply alternate on-screen with one click and font matching to help identify similar typefaces found in images.

Discover how the new Select and Mask dedicated “taskspace” in Photoshop CC makes creating selections and masks easier, more exact, and more efficient than ever before.

Discover new features and enhancements made to Artboards including new background color properties and easier duplication of layer(s) and layer groups, Adjustment and Fill layer support for Looks and Patterns created in Capture CC, read-only Library Collaboration, and new Export options for embedding color profiles and additional Artboard improvements.

Quickly correct perspective in a photograph with precision and control using the new Transform Panel, Guided Upright tool, and Offset sliders. Manually positioned guides automatically correct converging vertical and horizontal lines in images which can then be repositioned within the canvas area.

In this video, Julieanne walks through the new Start and Recent Files workspaces, updated interface, and customizable Toolbar.

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how Artboards can increase your productivity when designing multiple versions of an image within a single document, as well as the new features and enhancements added to Artboards.

With the addition of linked Smart Objects, Creative Cloud Libraries are now more powerful than ever. In this video, Julieanne will demonstrate the Libraries panel’s new features and enhancements including sharing assets using linked Smart Objects as well as create a Library from a document in a single click.

In this video, Julieanne covers all of the improvements made to the Type tool including viewing recent fonts, filtering by classification, selecting favorite fonts, viewing similar and more.

In this video, Julieanne will demonstrate how Quick Export and Export As can be used to save entire documents, multiple Artboards, as well as individual layers and layer groups.

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to apply a painterly look to an image using the completely re-coded Oil Paint filter.

In this short tip, Julieanne demonstrates how the new Dehaze control in Lightroom CC and Phtooshop CC 2015 can help dramatically improve an image by removing haze or, add artistic atmosphere by adding haze.

In this short tip, Julieanne demonstrates how to add noise back into the blurred area in order to create a more realistic effect.

Learn how easy it is to stitch together multiple files into a panorama that has all of the editing flexibility of a raw file.

Discover how to combine bracketed exposures into a High Dynamic Range image that has all of the editing flexibility of a raw file.

In this video Julieanne explains how Smart Objects are even smarter than before. Discover how to choose between embedding or linking a Smart Object, knowing that at any time, you can change your mind and convert embedded to linked. Hand-off packaged files to your clients with confidence, knowing that you will never leave a linked file behind.

In this video Julieanne demonstrates how to use the new, nondestructive Spin Blur in Photoshop to create realistic motion effects including the ability to spin an object at variable angles, as well emulate traditional strobe effects with the ability to define the strength, number of flashes and duration.

In this video Julieanne walks through Photoshop CC’s new Path Blur including how to control the direction, speed, taper, and shape of motion paths to make creative enhancements to your image.

In this video Julieanne demonstrates the new features and enhancements made to the type tools including Font Search, Instant Font previews and seamless integration with Typekit.

In this video Julieanne takes a close look at how Photoshop makes aligning and distributing layers and shapes easier than ever with improvements made to Smart Guides including determining distances between objects as well as a layers positioning within a document. Discover how these new features make aligning and distributing multiple shapes and layers faster than ever before.

In this video Julieanne will show you how to remove distracting elements using the improved Content-Aware technologies including the ability to blend colors and textures better than ever before.

In this video Julieanne will show you how to seamlessly work with the newly refined Layer Comps. Learn how individual layer attributes can be easily updated and then synchronized across multiple Layer Comps and as well as how to use Smart Objects with nested (embedded) Layer Comps to create multiple iterations within a single document which can be displayed in a single click.

In this video Julieanne will demonstrate how to make selections based on depth of field using Focus Mask to help isolate portions of your image for further editing.

In this video Julieanne takes a close look at several feature enhancements and refinements made to the Color Panel, Brushes, Preference, Sync Settings, Experimental Features and more to demonstrate how Photoshop CC and Creative Cloud together give you the most powerful tools for creating your designs and working with your images.

Julieanne takes a close look at several feature enhancements and refinements made to scripted patterns including placing patterns along a path, rendering unique trees for concept, architectural and fine art images and scripted border designs. Learn how to unlock the background into a layer with a single click, choose recent colors from the swatches panel and add and change color readouts for multiple color samplers at once.

Julieanne demonstrates Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC. Discover when to embed and when to link Smart Objects as well as learn how to update modified content, resolve missing files and filter based on Smart Object attributes.

Julieanne walks through the new Perspective Warp feature in Photoshop CC. Learn how to create quads, adjust the layout, and distort the perspective of an image.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates five of her favorite new and improved features for working with vectors. Discover path creation improvements, isolation mode, drag-selecting paths, path operation shortcuts, and more.

Note: If you are new to Photoshop or skipped version 6, you might want to take a look at the re-engineered shape tools in this video “What’s New in Adobe Photoshop CS6” (vector layers begin at @ 44:45). And, you can learn about rounded rectangles and Live Shape Properties in this video: “Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers”.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to take multiple exposures and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR file that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop. In addition, you’ll discover how powerful using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter can be when working with layered files.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne takes a close look at the feature enhancements and refinements made to the Crop tool, workflow settings, and batch saving capabilities in Adobe Camera Raw. In addition she also covers improvements made to the Spot Removal Tool, Noise Reduction, Local Adjustment Brush, and Histogram.

Note: For more information about the Features in Camera Raw 8.0 including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal features please see this video Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers.

In this Quick Tip Julieanne demonstrates three different ways to display an image within a shape in Photoshop including vector masks, clipping masks and layer groups.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how nesting Smart Objects enables each filter applied to have it’s own unique Smart Filter (layer) masks.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to use Hue, Saturation, Luminance and the Adjustment Brush to selectively control color in Lightroom. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

Layer Groups — they’re not just for organizing your layers! In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates 5 ways to use Layer Groups to create special effects in Photoshop.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne explains how Lightroom determines the file size and resolution of a file when using the Edit in Photoshop command.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne reveals her Lightroom-to-Photoshop workflow used to create the still life “Cyclical”.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne explains the difference between duplicating a Smart Object using the Layers panel to create multiple instances of a layer, and creating a copy of a Smart Object using the application menu for independent editing.

In this Quick Tip Julieanne reveals a simple technique to paste content directly into a layer mask in Photoshop CS6.

Learn Julieanne’s top 5 favorite features in Photoshop 13.1 including refinements to the Crop Tool, nondestructive editing with Blur Gallery and Liquify, increased efficiency with Conditional Actions, practical default Type Styles and support for Retina displays on Macintosh.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne explains the difference between duplicating a Smart Object using the Layers panel to create multiple instances of a layer, and creating a copy of a Smart Object using the application menu for independent editing.

Did you know that you can not only reposition but also transform images over time In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how easy it is using the power of Smart Objects in Photoshop CS6.

In this Quick Tip Julieanne reveals a technique to create a mask using the reflected gradient which can quickly be repositioned over time without retouching.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to mask a video clip in Photoshop CS6 to reveal motion in a selective region of the clip over time.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates two methods for one of the most common trouble shooting techniques: resetting the Photoshop Preferences.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne explains the best way to add a color tone to an image using the Split Tone and Tone Curve panels and shows how to save presets to increase your productivity. Click here to download the presets discussed in the video. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates the best way to convert images to Black and White as well as how to save presets to increase your productivity. Click here to download the presets discussed in the video. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

In this episode of The Complete Picture discover the power of making selective adjustments like dodging and burning, color corrections and noise removal using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 4. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6.

Even with the fantastic new Blur Gallery in Photoshop CS6, the Lens Blur filter is an essential tool when a high degree of control is needed to selectively (and realistically) blur an image. In this video tutorial, Julieanne uses the Lens Blur filter with a depth map to to create a series of images that appear as if they were captured with a tilt-shift lens. Julieanne also demonstrates how to quickly apply this filter to multiple images using actions and batch processing.

In this Quick Tip Julieanne demonstrates the new Oil Paint filter in Photoshop CS6 to quickly create a painterly image which can stand on it’s own or be used as an under painting for more elaborate artwork.

In this video tutorial Julieanne walks you through the best way to pan and zoom a "time lapse" image sequence, video clip and still photograph using the new Motion options in Photoshop CS6. For those wanting even greater control, Julieanne also demonstrates how to use smart objects to take advantage of Photoshop CS6’s new Transform attribute in the Timeline panel.

In this Quick Tip Julieanne demonstrates the new Color Lookup Adjustment Layer and walks you through how to download a template to quickly apply these new "looks" to your images.

The Gradient Map Adjustment Layer has over 35 new presets to emulate traditional darkroom techniques for toning and split-toning photographs. Learn how to load and apply gradient maps to a single image as well as how to download and use Julieanne’s template to quickly see what each preset would look like on your own photograph through the magic of Smart Objects.

In this Quick Tip Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly crop two images to the same size using the Front Image option as your source.

There are several advantages to the newly redesigned Crop tool in Photoshop CS6. In this video tutorial Julieanne demonstrates the refined interface, new features, customizable presets, enhanced tools and essential shortcuts that will make cropping easier than ever.

In this episode join Julieanne as she shows off some of the new features of Adobe Photoshop CS6 Extended, part of the new Adobe Creative Cloud. See the blazingly fast performance of the new Mercury Graphics Engine. Learn about the new improved processing and enhanced controls in Adobe Camera Raw 7, the new photographic blur effects, how to straighten objects using the new Adaptive Wide Angle, and more. Explore many of the timesaving and user-inspired enhancements including new type styles, re-engineered Shape layers, and the all-new Crop tool.

Learn how to create the highest quality photographs by taking advantage of new and improved global and local adjustments in Adobe Camera Raw. Julieanne demonstrates the best way to recover detail in shadow and highlight areas, make sophisticated tone curve adjustments on a per channel basis, apply chromatic aberration on the fly, and selectively paint color, tonal and noise reduction adjustments.

Learn time-saving techniques to boost your productivity as Julieanne reveals essential enhancements that will improve the way you work with Layers, Groups, the Properties panel, and much more!

Discover how to create photographic blur effects in a few clicks using intuitive, on-canvas controls in Photoshop CS6. Julieanne shows you how to soften select areas with Tilt-Shift blur, uniformly blur your entire image and then sharpen a single focal point with Iris blur, or select multiple focal points and then let Field blur vary the blurriness between them.

Take a tour of the new features and improved vector workflow in Photoshop CS6. Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly add custom strokes and fills to Shape layers, combine shapes without rasterizing layers, and use new alignment options and Pixel Grid for better rendering.

Increase your productivity when working with type by creating Paragraph and Character styles in Photoshop CS6. With these styles, you can apply formatting to selected characters, lines, or paragraphs with a single click.

Learn how Photoshop CS6 can help you to explore new mediums with intuitive video creation. Julieanne walks through how to automatically sequence clips, use live previews for trimming, combine multiple audio tracks, drag and drop transitions, apply pan and zoom effects, and output videos using presets for popular devices.

Take a quick look at Julieanne’s favorite 6 features in Photoshop CS6 Beta, including improved processing in Adobe Camera Raw, the intuitive new Blur Gallery, time-saving type styles, re-engineered Shape layers, powerful video editing tools, and the redesigned Crop tool, and auto-select interpolation.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates the power of the Art History brush in Photoshop CS5 and its ability to continuously sample from any history state or snapshot. She will show you how to create compelling, painterly images by making simple changes to the default settings and utilizing a variety of different brush tips and presets.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne reveals there is far more to the History Panel than simply un-doing mistakes. Learn as she reveals little-known shortcuts for working with the History Panel, including how to fill with the History Brush, as well as a fluid method for painting between snapshots with no layer or masking knowledge required!

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne helps you avoid unwanted or puzzling results by answering the three most frequently asked questions around opening and round-tripping files from Lightroom to Photoshop.

In this quick tip Julieanne reveals an automated feature for adding arrowheads to the beginning or end of lines in Photoshop.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to eliminate repetitive tasks and increase efficiencies in Photoshop by customizing the tools you use the most and saving them as Presets.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates the incredible power of Variables in Photoshop. Learn how to cut hours of time out of your production time when you need to combine text and photographs. Although this feature has been in Photoshop for many releases, only a small number of customers know of its immense power for tasks such as automating event photography, creating web banners and graphics.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to reduce the color palette of an image to create a posterized effect with the most control and maximum flexibility possible.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to create a single vector logo out of multiple type and shape layers, specify a consistent size, apply a style and save the entire creation as a Tool Preset! In addition, Julieanne shows how to add a scan of your signature to any photograph with a simple change of a layer blend mode.

Learn how to use Photoshop Actions to create Droplets that can be used in Lightroom to batch process images after exporting files.

Note: Although this video was recorded in previous versions of Lightroom and Photoshop, the technique will still work today and, in fact, you could create conditional actions and process both vertical and horizontal files at one time! Use this link to find out more about conditional actions in Photoshop.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne focuses on little known features and helpful hints for creating actions to successfully automate tasks in Photoshop.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne discusses how the addition of color as well as supporting imagery can help reinforce the mood and message of a composite image that a single photograph may fail to do on its own. Discover how to composite images through the use of masking, blend modes, smart objects, gradients and edge effects.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne reveals some basic compositing techniques in Photoshop CS5 that she used to illustrate the feeling and mood of Iceland. Discover how easy it is to combine multiple images together using layers, masking, blend modes, and transparency in Photoshop CS5.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to use Lightroom 3's Develop Module to use color, tone, placement of content, and stylistic effects to give a series of images a unified look and feel. Learn how to use leading lines to tie images together as well as repeating shape, detail and balance to form a cohesive story. Note: although this was recorded in Lightroom, many of the techniques can be replicated in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS5.

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne discusses how to select multiple images to work together as diptychs and triptychs. Learn how to select photographs with similar attributes such as color and shape, mood and lighting, line and form will help to unify two (or more) photographs, perhaps even creating new meaning though the relationship of the imagery.

Discover the advantage of working with and archiving to the DNG raw file format over proprietary raw file formats as well as choose which tool to use to convert your files as you move through your workflow.

Join Julieanne as she covers all those little features in Adobe Photoshop CS5 that you may not know about that can make your life easier.

Join Julieanne as she explains a new feature found in Adobe Photoshop CS5 called Mini Bridge, which lets you access all your creative assets, sort and filter them and then drag them right into your document.

This video demonstrates how Julieanne layers different elements together using Photoshop to create her digital illustrations (composites).

Somewhere between the decisive moment and moving pictures lies the world of digital compositing - where multiple images captured at different times layer together to create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts. In this episode Julieanne Kost will demonstrate how to transform concepts and ideas into images by mastering the tools used in compositing.

In this episode follow along as Julieanne Kost uses Lightroomand Photoshop to showcase some of the new features as she creates a digital composite based on the concept of “Twilight”.

I've selected my favorite images that I've posted over the past year on Instagram and created a short slideshow from them. I enjoy reflecting on the past year and always try to see the relationship between events in my life. I would strongly encourage you to create a collection of your own images for the year—I have found both the process and the results to be very insightful.

Last year I created a short slideshow (Moments Alone), from images taken over the year using my mobile phone. I found it to be a enjoyable way to look back at the year and reflect upon the places that I’ve gone, the people I’ve met and the things that I paid attention to. So, I decided to do it again this year and here is the result “Fractured Moments”. I would strongly encourage you to create a collection of your own images for the year -I have found both the process and the results to be very insightful.

Last year I created a short slideshow (The Red Thread), of the images that I took with my mobile phone. I found it to be a enjoyable way to look back at the year and reflect upon the places that I’ve gone, the people I’ve met and the things that I was paying attention to. So, I decided to do it again this year and here it is — Moments Alone. I’m sure that the images will mean more to me than they do to you, but I would encourage you to create a collection of your own images and look at them as a complete body of work for the year.

I decided to organize the images that I shot and processed using my camera phone and Instagram in the past 6 months. After selecting my favorites and printing them (yes, I printed them!) in order to decide how to sequence them, I knew that they had to be shown as diptychs. (Perhaps if you attended Photoshop World in the spring, you might remember some of the early images that I showed on the Art of Digital Photography panel.) I hope you enjoy the video 4.31

Photoshop Tutorials by Julieanne Kost

If you prefer to view the videos by date created, click the link to my website (www.jkost.com) on the right, under Additional Information. Although some of these videos were recorded with previous versions of Photoshop, the information/concepts are still relevant. When content becomes outdated, I will move it to the “Archive” section at the bottom of the list – or delete it altogether if it is no longer useful.

This is an ongoing series of quick tips covering a range of Photoshop shortcuts and tips. You can subscribe to this playlist as well.

WHAT’S NEW IN ADOBE CAMERA RAW (April, 2018 release)

Learn all about the new capabilities that have been added to Profiles in Adobe Camera Raw.

WHAT’S NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CC (October 2017 release)

New Brush Preset Management in Photoshop CC
In this video, Julieanne takes a look at several improvements made to the way we work with brushes in Photoshop CC including more powerful brush presets, new default brushes, drag and drop organization, and more!

Brush Stroke Smoothing and Paint Symmetry in Photoshop CC
In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how the new smoothing option can help create beautiful brush strokes with the Brush, Pencil, Mixer Brush, and Eraser tools as well as how to use the Paint Symmetry technology preview to make symmetrical brush marks in Photoshop CC.

The New Curvature Pen Tool in Photoshop CC
Discover how easy it is to draw resolution independent, scalable vector paths in Photoshop CC with the new Curvature Pen tool.

WHAT’S NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CC 2017

In this video Julieanne demonstrates how to download a template into Photoshop CC 2017 and customize the contents by adding photos, changing colors, and modifying text.

WHAT’S NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CC 2015.5

When using the Crop tool to straighten a photo, use the new Content Aware option to intelligently fill in transparent areas with computer generated “Content aware” information in Photoshop CC. The video below demonstrates how. (06-2016)

Watch as Julieanne Kost demonstrates the new features and enhancements made to the Type tools in Photoshop CC including the ability to find similar fonts in the Adobe Typekit Library, apply on-canvas alternate glyphs, and use Font Match to identify similar typefaces in photos. (06-2016)

Discover how the new Select and Mask taskspace in Photoshop CC makes creating selections and masks easier, more exact, and more efficient than ever before. (06-2016)

Discover new features and enhancements made to Artboards including new background color properties and easier duplication of layers and layer groups, Adjustment layer support for Looks and Fill layer support for Patterns created in Capture CC, read-only Library Collaboration, and new export options for embedding color profiles and additional Artboard improvements. (06-2016)

WHAT’S NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CC 2015

In this short tip, Julieanne demonstrates how to add noise back into the blurred area in order to create a more realistic effect.

 WHATS NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CC 2014

Photoshop CC (2014): New features and enhancements (3 minute overview)

Check out the latest advancements in Photoshop CC for design and photography including Spin and Path Blurs in Blur Gallery, new typographic controls including Font Search and Typekit integration, enhancements to Smart Objects, Smart Guides, and Layer Comps, improved Content-Aware technologies, new Focus Mask, and workflow timesavers. Adobe evangelist Julieanne Kost will walk you through these new features and enhancements.

How to Add Realistic Spinning Motion Blur Effects in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates how to use the new, nondestructive Spin Blur in Photoshop to create realistic motion effects including the ability to spin an object at variable angles, as well emulate traditional strobe effects with the ability to define the strength, number of flashes and duration. (2014-06-18)

Adding Motion Blur Effects Along a Path in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne walks through Photoshop CC’s new Path Blur including how to control the direction, speed, taper, and shape of  motion paths to make creative enhancements to your image. (2014-06-18)

New Typographic Features in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne demonstrates the new features and enhancements made to the type tools including Font Search, Instant Font previews and seamless integration with Typekit. (2014-06-18)

How to Align and Distribute Layers Using Smart Guides in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne takes a close look at how Photoshop makes aligning and distributing layers and shapes easier than ever with improvements made to Smart Guides including determining distances between objects as well as a layers positioning within a document. Discover how these new features make aligning and distributing multiple shapes and layers faster than ever before. (2014-06-18)

How to use Layer Comps for Multi State Mock-ups in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne will show you how to seamlessly work with the newly refined Layer Comps. Learn how individual layer attributes can be easily updated and then synchronized across multiple Layer Comps and as well as how to use Smart Objects with nested (embedded) Layer Comps to create multiple iterations within a single document which can be displayed in a single click. (2014-06-18)

New Smart Object Features in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne explains how Smart Objects are even smarter than before. Discover how to choose between embedding or linking a Smart Object, knowing that at any time, you can change your mind and convert embedded to linked. Hand-off packaged files to your clients with confidence, knowing that you will never leave a linked file behind. (2014-06-18)

How to Remove Distracting Elements using the enhanced Content Aware Tools in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne will show you how to remove distracting elements using the improved Content-Aware technologies including the ability to blend colors and textures better than ever before. (2014-06-18)

How to use Focus Mask to Make Selections based on Focus in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne will demonstrate how to make selections based on depth of field using Focus Mask to help isolate portions of your image for further editing. (2014-06-18)

More Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC

In this video, Julieanne takes a close look at several feature enhancements and refinements made to the Color Panel, Brushes, Preference, Sync Settings, Experimental Features and more to demonstrate how Photoshop CC and Creative Cloud together give you the most powerful tools for creating your designs and working with your images. (2014-06-18)

WHAT’S NEW IN PHOTOSHOP CC 

Perspective Warp in Photoshop CC (V 14.2)

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne walks through the new Perspective Warp feature in Photoshop CC. Learn how to create quads, adjust the layout and distort the perspective of an object in an image.

Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC (V 14.2)

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates Linked Smart Objects in Photoshop CC. Discover when to embed and when to link Smart Objects as well as learn how to update modified content, resolve missing files and filter based on smart object attributes.

Top 5 Tips for Working With Vectors in Photoshop CC  

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates five of her favorite new and improved features for working with vectors. Discover path creation improvements, isolation mode, drag-selecting paths, path operation shortcuts, and more.

Hidden Gems in Photoshop CC (V 14.2)

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne takes a close look at several feature enhancements and refinements made to scripted patterns including placing patterns along a path, rendering unique trees for concept, architectural and fine art images and scripted border designs. Learn how to unlock the background into a layer with a single click, choose recent colors from the swatches panel and add and change color readouts for multiple color samplers at once.

Adobe Camera Raw 8.2 in Photoshop CC (v14.1)

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne takes a close look at the feature enhancements and refinements made to the Crop tool, workflow settings, and batch saving capabilities in Adobe Camera Raw.  In addition she also covers improvements made to the Spot Removal Tool, Noise Reduction, Local Adjustment Brush, and Histogram.

Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop CC

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how to take multiple exposures and combine them into a single 32-bit HDR file that can then be edited nondestructively using Adobe Camera Raw as a Smart Filter in Photoshop. In addition, you’ll discover how powerful using Camera Raw as a Smart Filter can be when working with layered file.

Adobe Photoshop CC: Favorite Features for Photographers

In this episode, Julieanne Kost will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop CC including the new Upright perspective correction, Radial Filter, and Spot Removal  features in Adobe Camera Raw 8, Image Upsampling and Smart Sharpening, Live Shapes for Rounded Rectangles, and Camera Shake Reduction. 2013-05-07

Julieanne’s Top 5 Features for Photographers in Photoshop 13.1 Exclusively for Creative Cloud Members

In this Episode of the Complete Picture , Julieanne will demonstrate her top 5 favorite features in Photoshop 13.1 including refinements to the Crop Tool, nondestructive editing with Blur Gallery and Liquify, increased efficiency with Conditional Actions,  practical default Type Styles and support for Retina displays on Macintosh. 2012-12-11

ADOBE CAMERA RAW AND DNG

Guided Upright in Adobe Camera Raw 9.6

Now you can quickly correct perspective in a photograph with precision and control using the new Transform Panel, Guided Upright tool, and Offset sliders. Watch as Julieanne demonstrates how to manually position guides to automatically correct converging vertical and horizontal lines in images, which can then be repositioned within the canvas area.

DeHaze in Photoshop CC 2015 and Lightroom CC

In this short tip, Julieanne demonstrated how the new Dehaze control in Lightroom CC and Phtooshop CC 2015 can help dramatically improve an image by removing haze or, add artistic atmosphere by adding haze.

Raw High Dynamic Range Imaging within Adobe Camera Raw 9.0

Discover how to combine multiple bracketed exposures into a single high dynamic range (HDR) image that has all of the editing flexibility of a Raw file.

Stitching Raw Panoramas within Adobe Camera Raw 9.0

Discover how to stitch together multiple files into a panorama that has all of the editing flexibility of a Raw file.

Raw High Dynamic Range Imaging within Adobe Camera Raw 9.0

Discover how to combine multiple bracketed exposures into a single high dynamic range (HDR) image that has all of the editing flexibility of a Raw file.

Stitching Raw Panoramas within Adobe Camera Raw 9.0

Discover how to stitch together multiple files into a panorama that has all of the editing flexibility of a Raw file.

Camera Raw Enhancements in Photoshop CS6

Learn how to create the highest quality photographs by taking advantage of new and improved global and local adjustments in Adobe Camera Raw. Julieanne demonstrates the best way to recover detail in shadow and highlight areas, make sophisticated tone curve adjustments on a per channel basis, apply chromatic aberration on the fly, and selectively paint color, tonal and noise reduction adjustments.  2012-04-23

Converting Images to Black and White

Julieanne demonstrates the best way to convert images to Black and White as well as how to save presets to increase your productivity. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6. Click here to download the presets for Lightroom 4 (JKost Black White.zip)  and Photoshop CS6 (PS_JKost Black White.zip). (2012-10-17)

The Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush

In this episode of The Complete Picture, discover the power of making selective adjustments like dodging and burning, color corrections and noise removal using the Graduated Filter and Adjustment Brush in Lightroom 4. Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6. (2012-10-10)

Toning Black and White Photographs

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne explains the best way to add a color tone to an image using the Split Tone and Tone Curve panels as well as demonstrates how to save presets to increase your productivity.Although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6. Click to download the Toning presets for Lightroom 4 (JKost_Toning.zip)  and Photoshop CS6 (PS_JKost Toning.zip).

Controlling Selective Color Changes in Lightroom

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how to use Hue, Saturation, Luminance and the Adjustment Brush to selectively control color in Lighroom Note: although this video was recorded in Lightroom, the same techniques are available in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS6. (2013 -03-13)

Why Does the  Photograph’s Preview Change in Lightroom and Bridge

In this video tutorial Julieanne explains one of the great mysteries of Lightroom and Bridge – why Lightroom (or Bridge) displays a photograph one way and then changes the way it looks a moment later. It will all become clear with just a little information about how digital camera files are captured and displayed by different applications. 2012-07-23

Enhancing the Light
In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates what you can do in Lightroom’s Develop module to enhance your photographs using color and tonality to change the mood and atmosphere of an image. We all know that the goal is to capture the best photograph in camera, but what happens when we aren’t at the right place at the right time Julieanne will show you how to make subtle changes to increase the photograph’s emotional impact. Note: although this was recorded in Lightroom, many of the techniques can be replicated in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS5. 2010-10-27

The Advantages of the DNG File Format
Discover the advantage of working with and archiving to the DNG raw file format over proprietary raw file formats as well as choose which tool to use to convert your files as you move through your workflow. 2010-07-22

Working with Camera Profiles
Learn how the new DNG camera profiles in Adobe Photoshop CS4 and Lightroom 2 can easily adjust the look and feel of your images. In this tutorial, Julieanne Kost walks you through the entire process. 2009-07-15

New Camera Raw Features in Photoshop CS5

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost goes over all the new refinements and enhancements you’ll find in the latest version of Adobe Camera RAW including Noise Reduction and Image Sharpening. 2010-05-14

LAYERS, MASKING AND COMPOSITING

5 Reasons to Use Layer Groups in Photoshop

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates 5 ways to use Layer Groups to create special effects. (03-01-2013)

How to Paste  Texture into a Layer Mask in Photoshop

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne reveals a simple technique to paste content directly into a layer mask in Photoshop

Cyclical – The Creative Process

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne reveals her Lightroom to Photoshop workflow used to create the still life “Cyclical”. (2012-02-13)

Julieanne’s Favorite Enhancements for Working with Layers in Photoshop CS6

Learn time-saving techniques to boost your productivity as Julieanne reveals essential enhancements that will improve the way you work with Layers, Groups, the Properties panel, and much more! 2012-04-23

Using Color to Add Emotional Impact to a Photograph
In this Episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne discusses how the addition of color as well as supporting imagery can help reinforce the mood and message of a composite image that a single photograph may fail to do on it’s own. Discover how to composite images through the use of masking, blend modes, smart objects, gradients and edge effects. 2011-02-03

New Digital Composite: Hindsight
In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne reveals some basic compositing techniques in Photoshop CS5 that she used to illustrate the feeling and mood of Iceland. Discover how easy it is to combine multiple images together using layers, masking, blend modes, and transparency in Photoshop CS5. 2010-10-03

The Power Of Smart Objects in Photoshop

Uncover the tremendous power behind Photoshop CS3’s smart objects. Add flexibility to your workflow using, non-destructive transformations, and one-click template content replacement. 2008-04-29

The Difference Between “Edit in Photoshop” and “Open as Smart Object”

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne show you the difference between opening a raw file as a pixel based layer verses a Smart Object and compares the advantages of both approaches. (2012-12-05)

The Difference Between Duplicating a Smart Object and Creating New Smart Object via Copy

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne explains the difference between duplicating a Smart Object using the Layers panel to create multiple instances of a layer and creating a copy of a Smart Object using the application menu for independent editing. (2013-01-02)

Applying Different Masks for Every Smart Filter in Photoshop

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how nesting Smart Objects enables each filter applied to have it’s own unique Smart Filter mask. (2013-040-03)

Using Leading Lines in Photography
In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates several ways to use leading lines in order to guide a viewer’s eye through an image including leading towards the primary subject, keeping movement within the frame, and adding tension to a composition. 2011-02-23

Applying the Lens Blur Filter for Selective Focus
In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost shows us how to get great results with the Lens Blur Filter in Adobe Photoshop CS4. 2010-03-01

Creating Diptychs Triptychs (Part 1)

In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne discusses how to select multiple images to work together as diptychs and triptychs. Learn how to select photographs with similar attributes such as color and shape, mood and lighting, line and form will help to unify two (or more) photographs, perhaps even creating new meaning though the relationship of the imagery. Note: although this was recorded in Lightroom, many of the techniques can be replicated in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS5. 2010-10-13

Creating Diptychs Triptychs (Part 2)

In this Episode of the Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to use Lightroom 3’s Develop Module to use color, tone, placement of content, and stylistic effects to give a series of images a unified look and feel. Learn how to use leading lines to tie images together as well as repeating shape, detail and balance to form a cohesive story. Note: although this was recorded in Lightroom, many of the techniques can be replicated in Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop CS5. 2010-10-20

The Creative Composite “Isostacy” (Photoshop CS5)
In this episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne Kost will demonstrate how to transform concepts and ideas into images by mastering the tools used in compositing. 2010-09-07

The Creative Composite “Twilight”

In this episode follow along as Julieanne Kost uses Lightroom 2.0 and Photoshop CS4 to showcase some of the new features as she creates a digital composite based on the concept of “Twilight”. 2008-11-04

 Creative Retouching Techniques and Edge Effects in Photoshop
Discover how to to completely change the look and feel of a photograph with some simple retouching, creative adjustments, and the addition of edges and texture. 2008-08-06

The Creative Composite “Drifting” (Photoshop)
Explore several of the new tools in Photoshop CS3 while Julieanne Kost walks you though the creation of a digital composite she created based on a personal assignment for the concept drifting. 2008-08-06

VECTORS, SHAPE LAYERS AND TYPE

Displaying a Photograph within a Shape in Photoshop

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne demonstrates three different ways to display an image with in a shape in Photoshop including vector masks, clipping masks and layer groups. 2013-04-24

Working with Shape Layers in Photoshop CS6

Take a tour of the new features and improved vector workflow in Photoshop CS6. Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly add custom strokes and fills to Shape layers, combine shapes without rasterizing layers, and use new alignment options and Pixel Grid for better rendering.2012-04-23

Paragraph and Character Styles in Photoshop CS6

Increase your productivity when working with type by creating Paragraph and Character styles in Photoshop CS6. With these styles, you can apply formatting to selected characters, lines, or paragraphs with a single click. 2012-04-23

Quick Tip – How to Add Arrowheads to Lines in Photoshop 

In this quick tip, Julieanne reveals an automated feature for adding arrowheads to the beginning or end of lines in Photoshop. 2011-09-28

Creating Transparent Logos for Watermarks and Overlays in Photoshop

In this Episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates how to create a single vector logo out of multiple type and shape layers, specify a consistent size, apply a style and save the entire creation as a Tool Preset! In addition, Julieanne shows how to add a scan of your signature to any photograph with a simple change of a layer blend mode. 2011-06-15

MORE PHOTOSHOP TECHNIQUES

Photographic Toning Presets in Photoshop CS6

The Gradient Map Adjustment layer has over 35 new presets to emulate traditional darkroom techniques for toning and split-toning photographs. Learn how to load and apply gradient maps to a single image as well as how to download and use Julieanne’s template to quickly see what each preset would look like on your own photograph through the magic of Smart Objects. 2012-07-09

Quick Tip – Color Lookup Adjustment Layer in Photoshop CS6

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne demonstrates the new Color Lookup Adjustment layer and walks you through how to download a template to quickly apply these new “looks” to your images.  2012-07-15

Tilt-Shift, Iris and Field Blur in Photoshop CS6

Discover how to create photographic blur effects in a few clicks using intuitive, on-canvas controls in Photoshop CS6. Julieanne shows you how to soften select areas with Tilt-Shift blur, uniformly blur your entire image and then sharpen a single focal point with Iris blur, or select multiple focal points and then let Field blur vary the blurriness between them.  2012-04-23

The Newly Redesigned Crop Tool in Photoshop CS6

There are several advantages to the newly redesigned Crop tool in Photoshop CS6. In this video tutorial, Julieanne demonstrates the refined interface, new features, customizable presets, enhanced tools and essential shortcuts that will make cropping easier than ever. 2012-6-25

Quick Tip – Cropping Two Images to the Same Size in Photoshop CS6

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne demonstrates how to quickly crop two images to the same size using the Front Image option as your source. 2012-07-02

Working with Photoshop’s History Panel, Snapshots and the History Brush

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost reveals there is far more to the History panel than simply un-doing mistakes. Learn as she reveals little known shortcuts for working with the History Panel, including how to fill with the History Brush, as well as a fluid method for painting between snapshots with no layer or masking knowledge required! 201-12-14

Posterizing Images with Control and Flexibility 

In this Episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how to reduce the color palette of an image to create a posterized effect with the most control and maximum flexibility possible. 2011-07-27

HDR and Tone Mapping Photoshop CS5
In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost covers the new Merge to HDR Pro and Tone Mapping Adjustment features in Adobe Photoshop CS5 which allow you to get a much higher dynamic range in your images. 2010-05-19

Photomerge, Auto Align and Content Aware Scale

Adobe Digital Imaging Evangelist Julieanne Kost shows you how Photoshop CS4 will help you with it’s intelligent scaling, alignment and auto-blending. 2009-10-30

AUTOMATION (ACTIONS, DROPLETS, SCRIPTS, PRESETS ETC.)

How to Reset Photoshop CS6’s Preferences File

In this episode of  The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates two methods for one of the most common trouble shooting techniques: resetting the Photoshop Preferences. (2012-10-31)

Create and Save Your Own Tool Presets in Photoshop CS5

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how to eliminate repetitive tasks and increase efficiencies in Photoshop by customizing the tools you use the most and saving them as Presets. 2011-09-21

Customizing the Photoshop Interface
Learn how to streamline Photoshop CS4 for your specific needs through the customization of Workspaces, Menus, Keyboard shortcuts, Preferences, Tool Presets, Palette Options, the Preset Manager and additional tips and techniques. 2008-10-01

Automating Photoshop Using Actions (Beginning)
Julieanne Kost teaches you how to accomplish more in less time using actions and batch processing in Photoshop CS3 to streamline your workflow and minimize repetitive tasks. 2008-05-31

Advanced Automation (Actions, Droplets And Scripts) in Photoshop
Take automation to a new level in Photoshop CS3 by mastering complex actions in order to turn several steps into one-click. Discover droplets, integration with LR and scripts. 2008-06-02

Helpful Hints for Creating Actions in Photoshop

In this Episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne focuses on little known features and helpful hints for creating actions to successfully automate tasks in Photoshop. 2011-06-01

Working with Variables

In this Episode of The Complete Picture Julieanne demonstrates the incredible power of Variables in Photoshop. You will learn how to cut hours out of your production time when you need to combine text and photographs. Although this feature has been in Photoshop for many releases, only a small number of customers know if its immense power for tasks such as automating event photography, creating web banners and producing graphics. 2011-08-04

PAINTERLY TECHNIQUES

Quick Tip – The Oil Paint Filter in Photoshop CS6

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne demonstrates the new Oil Paint filter in Photoshop CS6 to quickly create a painterly image which can stand it’s own or be used as an under painting for more elaborate artwork. 2012-08-27

The Secret to Photoshop’s Art History Brush

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost demonstrates the power of the Art History brush in Photoshop CS5 and its ability to continuously sample from any history state or snapshot. She will show you how to create compelling, painterly images by making simple changes to the default settings and utilizing a variety of different brush tips and presets. (2010-12-21)

MOVING IMAGES – VIDEO, ANIMATION AND TIME LAPSE

Working with Video in Photoshop CS6

Learn how Photoshop CS6 can help you to explore new mediums with intuitive video creation. Julieanne walks through how to automatically sequence clips, use live previews for trimming, combine multiple audio tracks, drag and drop transitions, apply pan and zoom effects, and output videos using presets for popular devices. 2012-04-23

How to Pan and Zoom Video in Photoshop CS6

In this video tutorial Julieanne walks you through the best way to pan and zoom a “time lapse” image sequence, video clip and still photograph using the new Motion options in Photoshop CS6. For those wanting even greater control, Julieanne also demonstrates how to use smart objects to take advantage of Photoshop CS6’s new Transform attribute in the Timeline panel. 2012-08-06

Masking Video for Special Effects in Photoshop CS6

In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how to mask a video clip in Photoshop CS6 to reveal motion in a selective region of the clip over time. 2012-11-07

Quick Tip – Creating Masks to Move Over Time in Photoshop CS6

In this Quick Tip, Julieanne reveals a technique to create a mask using the reflected gradient which can quickly be repositioned over time without retouching.

Transforming Layers Over Time in Photoshop CS6

Did you know that you can not only reposition but also transform images over time In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne demonstrates how easy it is using the power of Smart Objects in Photoshop CS6.

Using the Lens Blur Filter on an image Sequence in Photoshop CS6

Even with the fantastic new Blur Gallery in Photoshop CS6, the Lens Blur filter is an essential tool  when a high degree of control is needed to selectively (and realistically) blur an image. In this video tutorial, Julieanne uses the Lens Blur filter with a depth map to to create a series of images that appear as if they were captured with a tilt-shift lens. Julieanne also demonstrates how to quickly apply this filter to multiple images using actions and batch processing. 2012-08-20

Making a Movie in Photoshop Extended (Part 1)
In this episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost shows you how to create a video file using an image sequence in Adobe CS4 Photoshop Extended. 2010-05-23

Making a Movie in Photoshop Extended (Part 2)
In part 2 of this two-part episode of The Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost continues to show you how to create a video file using an image sequence. This episode focuses on adding effects and audio. 2010-05-30

WORKING WITH BRIDGE AND LIGHTROOM

 Should I Use Lightroom or Bridge

In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost helps you decide which application is right for your workflow by explaining the differences between Lightroom and Bridge for managing images and assets.

Moving between Lightroom and Photoshop

In this video tutorial, you’ll learn how to seamlessly move images between Lightroom and Photoshop with the exact control that you need. Discover how easy it is to create panoramas, merge 16 bit high-dynamic range (HDR) images and open multiple photographs into a single file in Photoshop.

Lightroom, Photoshop, Image and File Size

In this episode of The Complete Picture (Lightroom, Photoshop, Image and File Size), Julieanne explains how Lightroom determines the file size and resolution of a file when using the “Edit in Photoshop” command. (2013-02-20)

Opening Files from Lightroom into Photoshop – FAQ
In this episode of the Complete Picture, Julieanne Kost helps you avoid unwanted or puzzling results by answering the three most frequently asked questions around opening and round-tripping files from Lightroom to Photoshop. 2011-10-05

New Features in Bridge and Mini Bridge CS5

Join Julieanne Kost as she explains a new feature found in Adobe Photoshop CS5 called Mini Bridge, which lets you access all your creative assets, sort and filter them and then drag them right into your document. 2010-05-31

Moving Between Lightroom 3 and Photoshop CS5
Learn how to take a single image or multiple images for editing seamlessly between Lightroom and Photoshop. Also, see how to use Photoshop tools like Photomerge, HDR pro, and the export dialog in Lightroom for exporting multiple files. 2010-06-07

PHOTOGRPHY

Quiet Moments

I’ve created a slideshow as a simple way to look back at my year through the images that I’ve posted using Lightroom mobile to my Instagram account. I find this yearly exercise yields interesting insights about where I am in my life and allows me to reflect upon the places that I’ve gone and the experiences that I’ve had. I would strongly encourage you to create a collection of your own images for the year to see the path that you followed in 2015.

Visual Memories – The Year in Review

Another Year, and other slideshow! I’ve selected my favorite images that I’ve posted over the past year on Instagram and created a short slideshow from them. I enjoy reflecting on the past year and always try to see the relationship between events in my life. I would strongly encourage you to create a collection of your own images for the year -I have found both the process and the results to be very insightful.

Fractured Moments

Last year I created a short slideshow (Moments Alone), from images taken over the year using my mobile phone. I found it to be a enjoyable way to look back at the year and reflect upon the places that I’ve gone, the people I’ve met and the things that I paid attention to. So, I decided to do it again this year and here is the result  “Fractured Moments”. I would strongly encourage you to create a collection of your own images for the year -I have found both the process and the results to be very insightful

Moments Alone

I enjoyed my personal project so much from last year that I decided to do it again.  I’m sure that the images will mean more to me than they do to you, but I would encourage you – every year – to create a collection of your own images and look at them as a complete body of workto see what you can discover about yourself. (2012-12-15)

The Red Thread

This simple slideshow looks back at the year and reflects unon the places that I went, the people I’ve met and the things that I was paying attention to. All images were photographed on an iPhone, edited with Instagram and are displayed as Diptychs.   2011-06-07

ARCHIVE

What’s New in Adobe Photoshop CS6 (long version – 61 minutes)

In this episode, join Senior Digital Imaging Evangelist Julieanne Kost as she shows off  the new features of Adobe Photoshop CS6 Extended, part of the new Adobe Creative Cloud including the new improved processing and enhanced controls in Adobe Camera Raw 7, the new photographic blur effects, Adaptive Wide Angle,  type styles, re-engineered Shape layers, and the all-new Crop tool.

Julieanne’s Top 6 Photoshop CS6 Features (short version – 11 minutes)

Take a quick look at Julieanne’s favorite 6 features in Photoshop CS6 including improved processing in Adobe Camera Raw, the intuitive new Blur Gallery, time-saving type styles, re-engineered Shape layers, powerful video editing tools, and the redesigned Crop tool, and auto-select interpolation. 2012-04-23

Little Known Feature Enhancements in Photoshop CS5
Join Julieanne Kost as she covers all those little features in Adobe Photoshop CS5 that you may not know about that can make your life easier. 2010-06-10

Creating A Triptych In Photoshop
In this Adobe Photoshop CS4 tutorial, Julieanne Kost shows you how to open 3 images at once in Photoshop and then easily arrange them into a Triptych. Note: The reason that I moved this to the Archive section is that I find this much easier to do today using Lightroom. 2009-10-20

New Features of Adobe Bridge CS4

Discover the new features in Adobe Bridge CS4 as Julieanne Kost walks through the new features, tools, refined interface and integration with Photoshop and Adobe Camera Raw photoshop crack all version

2008-09-21

Free Adobe Photoshop Brushes - Introduction

Would you choose a plumber that uses a saw, when what he really needs is a wrench

One of the things that can be frustrating to creative professionals is receiving files that have been put together using the wrong piece of design software. It could be anything from using Adobe Illustrator instead of InDesign for layout or a logo that has been put together using Photoshop.

While it’s expected that pros should know this information, someone who’s cracking open the software for the first time might not even be aware that there are instances where you should be using one over the other. Just like a plumber would use the right wrench for the job, each program has a specific area that it excels at. So what I’ll be doing in this post is breaking down the three pieces of design software from Adobe – InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop and explaining when to use them.

By examining them in this way, you can see what your specific needs are, this should help you to decide what program you’ll start learning. You’ll want to focus your attention on the piece of software that is most relevant to what your goals, and then apply that knowledge to the other two.

When to use Adobe InDesign

There should be no confusion about when to use InDesign – its specific purpose is for laying out printed materials; that’s what it is designed to do. This could be brochures, newsletters, ads, business cards or books. Virtually anything that is made up of a combination of blocks of text, photos or other artwork. Its purpose is to take the elements that you create in Illustrator and Photoshop and put them together in one place.

InDesign excels at projects that require multi-page layouts or master layouts where one theme reoccurs on multiple pages. Its text wrap functionality (where you can literally wrap text around images or objects) is much simpler and easier to use than it is in Illustrator.

People can, and do, put together layouts with Photoshop or Illustrator. However, in doing so, they often create files that are needlessly huge or put together in ways that are not optimal for commercial printers to use. InDesign, however, packages everything for you – all of your fonts and images. It does this so that you can hand off these materials to your printer and they can make your layout work in the exact manner that you intended.

While InDesign is a powerful tool, it does have its limitations. For one, it doesn’t have any photo editing capabilities. InDesign does give you the ability to draw vector graphics, like those you might find in a logo, but it doesn’t hold a candle to what you can do with Illustrator. Which brings us to…

When to use Adobe Illustrator

Illustrator, as its name suggests, is for creating and editing vector based illustrations such as logos and brand marks or other design elements. Vector graphics are scalable images that can be sized as small or as large as you need them to be, and still maintain their resolution and clarity.

While it is possible to create multi-page documents with Illustrator for items like brochures or annual reports, there are a few drawbacks to using the program in this way:

  1. Illustrator doesn’t have a way to setup master pages the way that InDesign does. This is a necessary tool when you’re building documents that use templates.
  2. Illustrator doesn’t allow you to automate page numbers. This is another feature InDesign supports, which can be especially useful when dealing with larger documents.

When to use Adobe Photoshop

Plain and simple, Photoshop is for creating and editing photos and raster (pixel) based art work. The program was originally developed as a tool to enhance photographs, but over time its functionality has developed to the point where it can be used to create:

  • User interface designs
  • Web pages
  • Banner ads
  • Video graphics
  • Editing pictures for print

Because there is so much information about Photoshop out there in the form of tutorials and guides, some people feel that it’s all you need – a one stop shop. This couldn’t be further from the truth. The problem is that there are instances when you don’t need to use Photoshop, and should in fact be using Illustrator or InDesign.

  1. Do not create logos with Photoshop – It’s a bad idea that will do nothing but cost you time and money. Again, Photoshop is pixel, or raster based. If you create a logo with it, the files that it creates can not be enlarged or manipulated in the same manner that an Illustrator-based logo can.
  2. Do not set type in Photoshop for print projects – For type to print at its clearest, it needs to be vector based; Photoshop exports type as pixels. Now, you can save your Photoshop files in as an .EPS file which allows you to export type as vectors, but still this is not a best practice, so just don’t do it.

Conclusion

Hopefully this article has helped to clear up some of the confusion that surrounds these pieces of software and when to use them. While I’ve only scratched the surface as far as the capabilities of Adobe InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop, these are some of their most fundamental applications. Thinking about what you need to do with these programs will help you to organize your workflow better and ultimately create more professional looking documents MAGIX Movie Edit Pro 2013 Premium

Posted in Design Tutorials, Illustrator Tips Tutorials, InDesign Tips Tutorials, Photoshop Tips Tutorials, Print Design

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